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Circulate on Fridays: 10 essential circular economy videos and much more

You know the drill by now – Friday is the day we wrap up the week’s best circular economy action. This week we cover bioplastics, kids’ clothes and a bundle of circular economy videos from some of the world’s best speakers. Enjoy!

We know it’s not the time of year to be sat inside watching videos on YouTube, but make an exception for those from the 2017 Summit on the circular economy, curated last month by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. Highlights include UnSchool’s Leyla Acaroglu exploring the existential, IDEO’s Tim Brown telling us how we’re all designers, and Nikki Silvestri getting serious about soil, as well as seven more speeches from leaders in education, design and food systems. Kick back and catch up on the event with this essential viewing.

Image: Ellen MacArthur Foundation

Are you bored of hearing the axiom that ‘collaboration is key’? We are. Thankfully, Chandra Gnanasambandam and Michael Uhl delved deeper in Harvard Business Reviewthis week, adding nuance and advice for businesses small and large. They say that real innovation today isn’t about products, but about uncovering “new, unique partnership models” that “get past competitive angst and embrace their strengths and weaknesses”. The authors outline a new mindset with which to approach collaboration, on that will be vital for those taking the steps towards a circular economy.

There’s a new report out on cities and the circular economy; the result of six months’ research as part of a Master thesis from candidates at Blekinge Institute of Technology in Karlskrona, Sweden. The concise document centres around 16 case studies that show how the circular economy is influencing research, business, technology and urban development in cities around the world. Have a read for a whistle-stop tour of Amsterdam, Vancouver, Peterborough, Baltimore and Oslo, to name a few.

From the world of plastics, Full Cycle Bioplastics appeared on the Circulate radar this week, after the startup received funding from the Closed Loop Foundation. The company’s tech involves turning food waste into a versatile material with a variety of possible applications. From the report, it doesn’t sound like this is about just combining some leftover food with conventional plastic, the sort of materials mix-up that wouldn’t work in a circular economy. Instead, Full Cycle say that the end result is ‘compostable and marine degradable’, so this could be one to watch.

To round out today’s Circulate on Fridays, check out Ryan Yasin’s wonderful expanding children’s clothes. Fast-growing kids means fast turnover of clothes, so Ryan was taken with the idea of garments that grow with the child. The result is a design involving pleats that mean the trousers and tops can fit a child from 4 to 36 months – or seven more sizes than traditional garments.

See the concept in action in Dezeen’s video:

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The Author

Joe Iles

Joe Iles

I'm Editor in Chief of Circulate and Digital Architect at the Ellen MacArthur Foundation.

When I'm not discussing the circular economy, I also love talking about digital media and online trends, memes, music, bad films and good beer.

You can find me on twitter @joeiles or email joe[at]circulatenews.org

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