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Circulate on Fridays: Energy, manufacturing and money ripe for disruption

Every week, Circulate HQ puts our top selection of articles, videos and more on the circular economy and related subjects into one beautiful Friday gift! This week, we’re sharing pieces from some of the biggest business and technology online publications, including focuses on the latest disruptions in manufacturing, money flows, energy and plastic.

The Economist reminds us that it is nearly 150 years since the first solar and wind technologies were invented, and while they currently generate only 7% of the world’s electricity, renewable energy is now growing faster than any other supply and seeing significant costs. Read more online here, and find out about the significant investment now needed to tip regenerative energy sources over the edge.

It has long been argued and suggested through projected data that managing for long-term economic, social and environmental benefit works out for the best, and it has been a core part of the strategy for a number of businesses. However, a new piece of research from McKinsey Global Institute conducted in co-operation with FCLT Global has concretely found that companies operating with a long-term mindset have consistently outperformed their industry peers across every important financial measure since 2001.

Universal basic income (UBI) was the subject of a number of interesting articles once again. Elon Musk told the World Government Summit that he believes UBI will soon be made necessary by increasing automation, while Quartz had the latest on Ontario’s planned pilot. The Canadian state sees basic income as a potential support for cities being gutted by manufacturing job losses.

No more plastic cotton buds! In response to numerous campaigns emerging this week around ocean plastics, including the UN’s #CleanSeas, multinational corporation Johnson & Johnson has announced that it will remove the plastic from cotton buds, using paper instead.

Adidas has unveiled a new shoe produced using plastic waste taken from the sea. They claim that they’ll produce one million of this plastic waste line in 2017 and Suzanne Shelton explains just how significant that could be in GreenBiz this week.

How can businesses in the WEEE sector move to a more effective model? A new initiative by the Danish Industries Association aims to tackle precisely that challenge.

Have you heard the first episode of our new podcast series? Listen to this interview with Elizabeth Yee from 100 Resilient Cities. 

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The Author

Seb Egerton-Read

Seb Egerton-Read

Seb writes daily content for Circulate across the full spectrum of the website's topics. Previously he has spent five years as a freelance writer for a number of websites and blogs. You can e-mail Seb at seb[at]circulatenews.org

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