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Circulate on Fridays: Exploring the circular economy in depth, growing animal products and more!

In this weekend’s special Circulate on Fridays, and as part of our collaboration with the Disruptive Innovation Festival (DIF), we are showcasing three select DIF events on Circulate. As always, we want to know what you think, let us know on our About page or in the comment space below. 

What Goes Around…

A circular economy is not a new idea, rather it is a term that has gone from relative obscurity only five years ago, to one which any serious CEO now has on their radar.  Understanding the concept is one thing; implementing a framework which requires whole systems change is quite another. The Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s Joss Bleriot, Ken Webster and Ella Jamsin discussed the evolution of the concept and how business and governments are beginning to take it on.

The Crucial Role of SMEs

Small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are the backbone of our economy. In Europe alone, 99% of all businesses are SMEs and in the past five years, they have been responsible for the creation of approximately 85% of all new jobs and provided two-thirds of the total private sector employment in the EU. Given the transformative role they play, how can they be best supported in the transition to a circular economy?

The analysis shows us that business decisions to transition towards circular business models are likely to realise both short- and long-term benefits, thus fostering business competitiveness and resilience in the long run. However, making the transition or bringing scale to new business initiatives can be challenging. In this session, members of the London Waste and Recycling Board (LWARB) are joined by SMEs the Restart Project and Snact.

Are Animal Products Without Animals the Future of Food?

How can we feed a rapidly growing population sustainably? The emerging science of cellular agriculture is looking into the possibility of growing products like meat, milk, eggs, and leather through biotechnology rather than sourcing them from animals. New Harvest is the research institute accelerating breakthroughs in this area. In this Q&A session, Daan Luining (Research Strategist) and Erin Kim (Communications Director) explained how the open source scientific research that their organisation funds and conducts is leading the way towards bringing cultured meat from lab benches to store shelves.

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The Author

Seb Egerton-Read

Seb Egerton-Read

Seb writes daily content for Circulate across the full spectrum of the website's topics. Previously he has spent five years as a freelance writer for a number of websites and blogs. You can e-mail Seb at seb[at]circulatenews.org

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